New paper published: Kin discrimination allows plants to modify investment towards pollinator attraction

New paper published: Kin discrimination allows plants to modify investment towards pollinator attraction

Two Evoflor’s members (José María Gómez and Rubén Torices) in collaboration with John Pannell from University of Lausanne have recently published a paper in Nature Communications showing that the self-incompatible monocarpic Moricandia moricandioides can adjust its flowering behaviour to the surrounding intraspecific social environment. Read more

Molecular phylogeny and evolutionary history of Moricandia DC (Brassicaceae)

Molecular phylogeny and evolutionary history of Moricandia DC (Brassicaceae)

We present in this paper a molecular phylogeny of the genus Moricandia (Brassicaceae). We have found that a Spanish population previously ascribed to Rytidocarpus moricandioides is indeed a Moricandia species, and we propose to name it as M. rytidocarpoides sp. nov. In addition, M. foleyi appeared outside the Moricandia lineage but within the genus Eruca. Therefore, M. foleyi should be excluded from the genus Moricandia and be ascribed to the genus Eruca. Read more

A general framework for effectiveness concepts in mutualisms

A general framework for effectiveness concepts in mutualisms

A core interest in studies of mutualistic interactions is the ‘effectiveness’ of mutualists in providing benefits to their partners. In plant-animal mutualisms it is widely accepted that the total effect of a mutualist on its partner is estimated as (1) a ‘quantity’ component multiplied by (2) a ‘quality’ component, although the meanings of ‘effectiveness,’ ‘quantity,’ and ‘quality’ and which terms are applied to these metrics vary greatly across studies. In addition, a similar quantity × quality = total effect approach has not been applied to other types of mutualisms, although it could be informative. Lastly, when a total effect approach has been applied, it has invariably been from a phytocentric perspective, focussing on the effects of animal mutualists on their plant partner. This lack of a common framework of ‘effectiveness’ of mutualistic interactions limits generalisation and the development of a broader understanding of the ecology and evolution of mutualisms. Read more

Niche differences may explain the geographic distribution of cytotypes in Erysimum mediohispanicum

Niche differences may explain the geographic distribution of cytotypes in Erysimum mediohispanicum

In a paper recently published in Plant Biology, we have identified environmental differences between niches occupied by diploids and tetraploids Erysimum mediohispanicum.

To evaluate the adaptive significance of the geographic distribution of cytotypes, we characterized the ploidy level of 118 populations across the Iberian Peninsula and obtained their interpolated climate variables from the Worldclim 1.4. In addition, we also characterized floral phenotype of both cytotypes. Read more